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February 2012

Bill Swanson, the CEO of Raytheon Corporation, has written a small book called “Unwritten Rules for Management”.

He offers suggestions like “strive for brevity and clarity in oral and written reports” (Rule #14) and “Don’t ever lose your sense of humor.” (Rule #24) It also offers more strategic tips like, “if you are not criticized, you may not be doing much.” (Rule #3)

One of the rules that resonated with me read, “Treat the name of your organization as if it were your own.” (Rule #26)

The reality here is that that each of us has the opportunity to be ambassadors for Tyndale. On one level, this means: be a good citizen when you are out in public. And on the other it challenges us to be extraordinary in our work, our lives and our choices.

In practice, this means being able to talk about who we are and what we do in a way that makes clear our distinctiveness as the Alumni of a Christian university, committed to the highest standards of excellence and Christian values, where our students seek to develop disciplined minds, transformed character and a passionate faith.

We are proud of our Alumni and how you are shaping the world through making the world around you better. And wherever you go, remember that you take the Tyndale name with you.

 

Blessings upon you,

Rev. Dr. Rob Patterson
Director, Alumni & Church Relations

 

 

Featured Alumni

Ian Bitton

B.Ed '11

I finished Tyndale’s B.Ed program in July of 2011 and was in Nunavut teaching by October 3rd. I wish I could say that this was due to my personal qualifications, but in fact, my wife Jenessa was hired by the City of Iqaluit and we were very thankful that they relocated us from Ontario to Nunavut.

Life in the north has been incredibly busy and an amazing learning experience so far. We miss our friends, our families and trees, but the land and the culture have so much beauty and history to offer that we are constantly being inspired. I teach grade 7 class (a challenge in itself) with a majority of Inuit students. School attendance is not always a priority in all Inuit homes because there is a large focus on passing on traditional Inuit values like spending time on the land hunting. These values often come before education which creates an interesting dynamic in the school system in Nunavut. Students often forget to take bullets and shell casings of their fall jacket pockets, and many of my students have already hunted and shot their first animals. With adventures like these available, teaching in a classroom is quite the challenge at times.

To add to these challenges, I am “qallunaat” (non-Inuit) and have been given the role of educating the youth of a group of people that have existed for thousands of years and have not always been treated with the honour and respect that they deserve. Many of my students are in foster care and unfortunately, abuse and alcoholism are a constant part of daily life for many children. My expectations as a teacher have changed -- I do my best to provide an environment of learning for most of my students, while for others, my focus is to simply provide a safe space.

Although this experience is full of challenges, I appreciate every day and I’m truly grateful for my students and my life in Nunavut.

If you’re interested in reading a bit more about our life in Iqaluit, please feel free to read my wife’s blog: yesjenessa.blogspot.com.
 

 
Rod Gautier

MDiv '96

On August 21, 2011 a class 3F tornado swept through the picturesque town of Goderich, Ontario leveling historic buildings, injuring dozens of residents and claiming one life. Rod Gauthier (BA ’88 M.Div. ’96) of First Baptist Church, Goderich lived through the devastation.

Rod shares his story, “After the tornado we went into town, we got to the church and realized that the top of the steeple was missing. The church building was unusable and still is. Whatever we had planned was gone. Whatever was important wasn’t. Whatever needed to be done was done: From serving meals at the emergency centre, to chopping down trees all day long.

The twelve churches in town gathered together for a worship service one week after the disaster. We had 1200 people in the school gymnasium. We met with a sense of unity and care for one another that I had never seen. Baptist, Presbyterian, United, Pentecostal, Christian Reformed, Anglican, it didn't matter; we all worked side-by-side together. The church in Goderich has changed. There is a hope and realization that they can do something.

The first time that we gathered as a church family at our home-away-from-home I said. ‘Welcome to First Baptist Church on the run.’ It was the first time in 110 years that we were homeless. The people began to realize that the church is not the building; the church is them—the people.

Pray that we would continue to be the feet, hands, and voice of God in our community. Pray that we don't lose the urgency that we now have. A tornado changed the town; it changed our church. The tornado changed people's lives. But God hasn’t changed at all.”

For more about the story, and to watch the video of Rod and Sherry and their experience.


 
Connie Smith

BRE '79

Connie Smith and her husband, Sylvain Paluku Kavunga, live in Goma, Congo. Connie originally went to Congo (then Zaire) in 1988 as a nurse. Connie and Sylvain currently have 14 people living in their house, including 7 of their 10 children, 3 grandchildren, their sister-in-law and a nephew staying in the garage. Connie works with World Vision to address humanitarian and health concerns in Congo, a country that has faced two wars and continual violence.


 
Doug Anderson

BTh '78

Doug is currently International Director of Emmanuel International, which works with churches in Northern Uganda. Doug and his team have been preparing a long-range training program for village health volunteers and rural pastors, and will start sending the first of several teams in January 2012. Doug and his wife, Beulah, live in Mississauga, ON with their two children, Bev and Dave. http://andersonministry.com

 


 

 

Distinguished Alumni Awards Nominations

Do you know a Tyndale grad that reflects exemplary Christian character or has demonstrated excellence in his/her vocation? Nominate a University or Seminary grad for the Distinguished Alumni Awards. The details and nomination forms can be found here.

First TALC Event with Dr. Gary Nelson – April 3, 2012

Tyndale Alumni are a living and active force. And one of the things they like to do is to get together and eat. So, here is the plan. Four times a year the Alumni are going to get together on campus, share lunch and enjoy a world class speaker. These gatherings will be called T.A.L.C. (Tyndale Alumni Lunch Conversations).

Our first TALC Event will be held on April 3, 2012. Dr. Gary Nelson will be addressing the results from the “Conversations with Dr. Gary Nelson” survey featured in the last e-newsletter.

Please contact the Alumni office at alumni@tyndale.ca if you would like more information or if you would like to attend.

Hope you can join us!

 

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Upcoming Events

Bill Swanson, the CEO of Raytheon Corporation, has written a small book called “Unwritten Rules for Management”.

He offers suggestions like “strive for brevity and clarity in oral and written reports” (Rule #14) and “Don’t ever lose your sense of humor.” (Rule #24) It also offers more strategic tips like, “if you are not criticized, you may not be doing much.” (Rule #3)

One of the rules that resonated with me read, “Treat the name of your organization as if it were your own.” (Rule #26)

The reality here is that that each of us has the opportunity to be ambassadors for Tyndale. On one level, this means: be a good citizen when you are out in public. And on the other it challenges us to be extraordinary in our work, our lives and our choices.

In practice, this means being able to talk about who we are and what we do in a way that makes clear our distinctiveness as the Alumni of a Christian university, committed to the highest standards of excellence and Christian values, where our students seek to develop disciplined minds, transformed character and a passionate faith.

We are proud of our Alumni and how you are shaping the world through making the world around you better. And wherever you go, remember that you take the Tyndale name with you.

 

Blessings upon you,

Rev. Dr. Rob Patterson
Director, Alumni & Church Relations

 

 

Featured Alumni

Ian Bitton

B.Ed '11

I finished Tyndale’s B.Ed program in July of 2011 and was in Nunavut teaching by October 3rd. I wish I could say that this was due to my personal qualifications, but in fact, my wife Jenessa was hired by the City of Iqaluit and we were very thankful that they relocated us from Ontario to Nunavut.

Life in the north has been incredibly busy and an amazing learning experience so far. We miss our friends, our families and trees, but the land and the culture have so much beauty and history to offer that we are constantly being inspired. I teach grade 7 class (a challenge in itself) with a majority of Inuit students. School attendance is not always a priority in all Inuit homes because there is a large focus on passing on traditional Inuit values like spending time on the land hunting. These values often come before education which creates an interesting dynamic in the school system in Nunavut. Students often forget to take bullets and shell casings of their fall jacket pockets, and many of my students have already hunted and shot their first animals. With adventures like these available, teaching in a classroom is quite the challenge at times.

To add to these challenges, I am “qallunaat” (non-Inuit) and have been given the role of educating the youth of a group of people that have existed for thousands of years and have not always been treated with the honour and respect that they deserve. Many of my students are in foster care and unfortunately, abuse and alcoholism are a constant part of daily life for many children. My expectations as a teacher have changed -- I do my best to provide an environment of learning for most of my students, while for others, my focus is to simply provide a safe space.

Although this experience is full of challenges, I appreciate every day and I’m truly grateful for my students and my life in Nunavut.

If you’re interested in reading a bit more about our life in Iqaluit, please feel free to read my wife’s blog: yesjenessa.blogspot.com.
 

 
Rod Gautier

MDiv '96

On August 21, 2011 a class 3F tornado swept through the picturesque town of Goderich, Ontario leveling historic buildings, injuring dozens of residents and claiming one life. Rod Gauthier (BA ’88 M.Div. ’96) of First Baptist Church, Goderich lived through the devastation.

Rod shares his story, “After the tornado we went into town, we got to the church and realized that the top of the steeple was missing. The church building was unusable and still is. Whatever we had planned was gone. Whatever was important wasn’t. Whatever needed to be done was done: From serving meals at the emergency centre, to chopping down trees all day long.

The twelve churches in town gathered together for a worship service one week after the disaster. We had 1200 people in the school gymnasium. We met with a sense of unity and care for one another that I had never seen. Baptist, Presbyterian, United, Pentecostal, Christian Reformed, Anglican, it didn't matter; we all worked side-by-side together. The church in Goderich has changed. There is a hope and realization that they can do something.

The first time that we gathered as a church family at our home-away-from-home I said. ‘Welcome to First Baptist Church on the run.’ It was the first time in 110 years that we were homeless. The people began to realize that the church is not the building; the church is them—the people.

Pray that we would continue to be the feet, hands, and voice of God in our community. Pray that we don't lose the urgency that we now have. A tornado changed the town; it changed our church. The tornado changed people's lives. But God hasn’t changed at all.”

For more about the story, and to watch the video of Rod and Sherry and their experience.


 
Connie Smith

BRE '79

Connie Smith and her husband, Sylvain Paluku Kavunga, live in Goma, Congo. Connie originally went to Congo (then Zaire) in 1988 as a nurse. Connie and Sylvain currently have 14 people living in their house, including 7 of their 10 children, 3 grandchildren, their sister-in-law and a nephew staying in the garage. Connie works with World Vision to address humanitarian and health concerns in Congo, a country that has faced two wars and continual violence.


 
Doug Anderson

BTh '78

Doug is currently International Director of Emmanuel International, which works with churches in Northern Uganda. Doug and his team have been preparing a long-range training program for village health volunteers and rural pastors, and will start sending the first of several teams in January 2012. Doug and his wife, Beulah, live in Mississauga, ON with their two children, Bev and Dave. http://andersonministry.com

 


 

 

Distinguished Alumni Awards Nominations

Do you know a Tyndale grad that reflects exemplary Christian character or has demonstrated excellence in his/her vocation? Nominate a University or Seminary grad for the Distinguished Alumni Awards. The details and nomination forms can be found here.

First TALC Event with Dr. Gary Nelson – April 3, 2012

Tyndale Alumni are a living and active force. And one of the things they like to do is to get together and eat. So, here is the plan. Four times a year the Alumni are going to get together on campus, share lunch and enjoy a world class speaker. These gatherings will be called T.A.L.C. (Tyndale Alumni Lunch Conversations).

Our first TALC Event will be held on April 3, 2012. Dr. Gary Nelson will be addressing the results from the “Conversations with Dr. Gary Nelson” survey featured in the last e-newsletter.

Please contact the Alumni office at alumni@tyndale.ca if you would like more information or if you would like to attend.

Hope you can join us!