Academic Integrity Policy

Integrity in all academic work is required from all students. Academic fraud is a serious matter with serious consequences. Knowingly aiding or abetting anyone in a breach of academic integrity shall in itself be considered misconduct and result in a written reprimand and possible expulsion from Tyndale University College.

1. Academic fraud and its consequences include the following:

  • Giving false information for the purpose of gaining admission or credits may result in expulsion from Tyndale University College, and/or in the revoking of the falsely obtained credits.
  • Submitting an assignment for which previous credit was given, either at Tyndale or at another institution, or submitting the same assignment for two courses, will result in an automatic grade of zero on one of the assignments. At the discretion of the Academic Standards Committee, the student may receive a grade of zero on the course. In rare circumstances, an expanded paper or project common to two courses of study may be submitted with prior approval from both faculty members.
  • Cheating on a test or examination will result, at a minimum, in a grade of zero on the test or examination. At the discretion of the Academic Standards Committee, the student may receive a grade of zero on the course.
  • Plagiarism, the use of another person’s words and/or ideas without full and proper acknowledgement, will result, at a minimum, in a grade of zero on the assignment. At the discretion of the Academic Standards Committee, the student may receive a grade of zero on the course. Any one of the following normally constitutes plagiarism:
    -Submitting a whole assignment or part thereof as the student’s own work (without acknowledging its source), when it was actually written by someone else (a stranger, another student, friend, family member, or the author of a book, article, web site or any other source). "Part thereof" can be as little as a sentence or two; plagiarism is not a matter of quantity. When a whole assignment has been copied from another source or written by another person, a grade of zero on the course is automatically assigned. Submission of an essay which has been substantially edited or rewritten by another person, such that the proficiency of writing no longer reflects the student’s own abilities, can also be considered academic fraud.
    -Using the exact wording of a source without putting the borrowed words in quotation marks, or following the syntax (structure) and/or wording of the source too closely. Even if a citation is given, this is still plagiarism, as it misrepresents the wording as the student’s own.
    -Including a source in the bibliography/works cited list/reference list, but giving no parenthetical citations or footnotes/endnotes in the essay to show exactly which quotations, ideas, or facts were taken from that source.
For further guidelines on proper acknowledgement of sources, consult the Tyndale University College Essay Writing Guide.

2. In most cases, in addition to the penalties listed above, a written reprimand will be placed in the student’s academic file. If academic fraud is established in more than one course, a written reprimand will be placed in the student’s file, and the student may be expelled from Tyndale University College. If the student has been fraudulent on more than one occasion in the same course, the student will receive a zero on the course, a written reprimand will be placed in the student’s file, and the student may be expelled from Tyndale University College.

3. In all cases of alleged academic fraud, the faculty or staff member will inform the Academic Standards Committee. He or she may also choose to speak with the student. In cases of alleged plagiarism, the faculty member will provide the Committee with the original copy of the student’s assignment, as well as copies of any sources from which material is alleged to have been plagiarized.

The Chair of the Academic Standards Committee will give written notice to the student by registered mail, indicating the nature of the alleged offence, and setting a date, time, and place for a hearing in which the accused will be afforded the opportunity to respond in writing and/or in person to the allegation. The student may be assisted and represented by another person of his or her choice. The student may waive his or her right to respond in writing and/or to appear in person.

After the hearing, the Academic Standards Committee will rule on the allegation. By registered mail, the Chair will notify the student of the ruling, including any penalties imposed. A copy will go to the faculty or staff member. Other faculty members, such as the student’s faculty advisor and the Dean of Students, may also be notified.

If a student voluntarily withdraws from a course in which he or she has been accused of academic fraud, the student may still receive a grade of "F" in that course, should the Academic Standards Committee determine that he or she has committed academic fraud.

4. Sometimes academic fraud will not be discovered until after a student has received a passing grade on an assignment, test, or examination. When this is the case, the student’s grade on the piece of work and /or the course may be changed retroactively to zero.

5. When deemed necessary, the Academic Standards Committee may send the student to the Writing Centre at the student’s expense.

6. Appeals of decisions concerning academic fraud may be made, on procedural grounds only, in writing to the Provost. Such appeals must be made within fourteen calendar days of the student having received notification of the decision of the Academic Standards Committee. The regular policies for appeals of grades on assignments and appeals of final grades do not apply to decisions concerning academic fraud.