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Ready for Change

Ready for Change

Hugh Rendle

“When I became the Director of Library Services, it was around the same time that Tyndale was granted university status by the Government of Ontario,” says Hugh Rendle [MTS 2011], Director of Library Services at Tyndale. “This was an exciting time in Tyndale’s history, especially in the library as our collections expanded to support the new Bachelor of Arts (BA) programs.” Hugh is on the faculties of both the university and the seminary. This has given him a unique and exciting perspective on Tyndale’s history.

Hugh’s family has a deep historical connection to Tyndale. When he was seven years old, Hugh used to visit the library at the London College of Bible & Missions (LCBM) where his father was a part-time teacher. His mother was a Tyndale alumna and many of his relatives attended Tyndale over the years.

“Throughout the years, Tyndale has offered a place where people from different denominations can come together and discuss different ideas, learn from each other and encourage one another.”

Hugh has been working at Tyndale since 1990. For the first 12 years, he was the Public Services Librarian. In 2002, he became the Director of Library Services – an administrative role he continues to enjoy today.

Space has always been a concern for Hugh when it comes to the library. “As enrollment and collections grow, there’s always this tension between having room for books and quality space for students to study and collaborate.”

As Tyndale moves to Bayview, he is looking forward to the amount of space people will have to study and meet with others. There will be a variety of different spaces made available, including lounge and study areas in the library, as well as a Wi-Fi equipped café beside it.

For Hugh, Tyndale’s 120th anniversary is a testament to the church and its ability to cooperate. “Throughout the years, Tyndale has offered a place where people from different denominations can come together and discuss different ideas, learn from each other and encourage one another,” he says. His hope is that this will continue and that many more of these multidenominational conversations will take place at Tyndale in the future.

As Hugh sees value in Tyndale’s ability to foster conversation within the church, his vision for Tyndale goes beyond the church walls. “As Canadians we’re part of a multicultural society. As Christians our voices need to be heard. My hope as Tyndale becomes more visible in Toronto [on Bayview Avenue] is that we come to understand our culture better and that our culture will understand us better as well.”

Even though Hugh is ready to move to a larger space, there are some things he will miss about the Ballyconnor campus. “When you move to a larger space you just wonder how you will make connections with people. Of course, things will change, but I think we’re ready for it.” 

 
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